Why You Should Know What Happened on October 10, 732

October 10, 732 It's the date that one man changed everything. Well, maybe not everything, just the course of European history. As a historian I've long known that the Battle of Tours is a key moment in world history. Why doesn't it receive more than a paragraph or two in world history textbooks? I can't … Continue reading Why You Should Know What Happened on October 10, 732

The Solitary Beauty of Muyil

Spectacular Mayan ruins, the sounds of nature in its full grandeur, the deepest of blues and the greenest of greens. Would you like to experience these sensations in one place? If the answer is yes, then all you have to do is venture just 10 miles south of Tulum. There you will find the archaeological and … Continue reading The Solitary Beauty of Muyil

Tulum Ruins: How to Have an Awesome Visit

The Tulum Ruins They're amazing, and definitely worth the visit. The Tulum ruins are second in number of visits only to the ruins outside of Teotihuacan. Hoards of tourists from Cancun and Playa del Carmen descend on the archaeological ruins in Tulum every day. By noon the site is so crowded you can't walk around … Continue reading Tulum Ruins: How to Have an Awesome Visit

Golden Mold Cape

The British Museum was on my "bucket list" for a very long time. After I was finally able to check it off, I spent some time thinking back to my one favorite exhibit. Even though my visit lasted just a few hours, I was able to take in some pretty amazing treasures, the Mold Cape above … Continue reading Golden Mold Cape

Malta’s Neolithic Underground

Let me tell you all about Malt'a's secret neolithic underground. It's been a while be since my last update. The last few months have gone by in a flash. The new school year started in early August (I teach 9th grade world history as many of you know), I got married on the day after Thanksgiving (whoo-hoo), there was … Continue reading Malta’s Neolithic Underground

10 History Blogs to Follow

Reposted from the Ancient History Encyclopedia Cuneiform Writing. Photographer Jan van der Crabben I've been spending most of my free time teaching 9th grade World History, but I'm thrilled too see Jaunting Jen included in the Ancient History Encyclopedia's list of 10 history blogs to follow. 10 History Blogs to Follow by Jade Koekoe There are hundreds … Continue reading 10 History Blogs to Follow

Saturday at Salubria

The name Salubria, comes from the Latin word for healthful, "salubrious." When you step in the mansion and feel the cool spring breeze blowing through the slightly offset north and south entrances, you can feel why the mansion earned its name. Have you ever wondered why old doorways are so small? I had always assumed … Continue reading Saturday at Salubria

Sperryville & Sister Caroline

The neatest bits of history can turn up just around the corner. Most of my musings have focused on grand historic sites around the world, but as I explore my new surroundings I can see that I don't need to travel 2,000 miles to see something cool. I haven't had much time to comment on … Continue reading Sperryville & Sister Caroline

7 Strange Artifacts from Malta

We know many things about history, but what we don't know outweighs what we think we know. Throughout my travels, I have come not only to embrace, but to seek out history's mysteries. If your eyes and your mind are open you can find mysteries whenever and wherever you travel. Malta is one of those places where … Continue reading 7 Strange Artifacts from Malta

Meet the Grey Sisters of Montreal

In 1737, Saint Marguerite d' Youville and three of her companions made a secret consecration to the task of helping anyone in need. Thus the Grey Sisters (sometimes called nuns) of Montreal were born. Their mission is one of love, respect, and compassion. Why you may ask, are they called the "Grey Sisters?" The first … Continue reading Meet the Grey Sisters of Montreal

Happy Summer Solstice

Although this photograph was taken in January, when I hear the words "summer solstice" it reminds me of Stonehenge. Although we are scientifically celebrating the tilt of the Earth's semi-axis, the summer solstice is so much more than that. From the Latin sol sistere (the sun stands still), the summer solstice has been celebrated for … Continue reading Happy Summer Solstice

Ghosts in the Brick

I really dig historic architecture, and recently I've started to notice these old brick buildings that have been built over multiple times. The first of these buildings that I noticed is in Mainz, Germany. Just the other day I was wandering around Boston's Chinatown looking for dinner and what did I find around the corner? Another building that … Continue reading Ghosts in the Brick