Why You Should Know What Happened on October 10, 732

October 10, 732 It's the date that one man changed EVERYTHING! As a historian I've long known that the Battle of Tours is a key moment in world history. Why doesn't it receive more than a paragraph or two in world history textbooks? I can't really answer that, but I suspect it has something to … Continue reading Why You Should Know What Happened on October 10, 732

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Golden Mold Cape

The British Museum was on my "bucket list" for a very long time. After I was finally able to check it off, I spent some time thinking back to my one favorite exhibit. Even though my visit lasted just a few hours, I was able to take in some pretty amazing treasures, the Mold Cape above … Continue reading Golden Mold Cape

Ravenna, Italy’s Arian Baptistry

Few Places stand out among my travels as much as the inspiring historic mosaics of Ravenna, Italy. Although I spent only a single day in Ravenna, I managed to view almost every ancient church that boasted a set of Byzantine Mosaics. Ravenna's history goes all the way back to the time of Emperor Augustus, who … Continue reading Ravenna, Italy’s Arian Baptistry

Emperor Valens from the Trier Mint

The Bode Museum in Berlin, Germany boasts a number of spectacular artifacts from the Roman Empire, but the medallion of the Emperor Valens particularly stands out. Valens was Emperor of the eastern half of the Roman Empire from 28 March 364 until his death at the battle of Adrianople (in Turkey near the border of Bulgaria … Continue reading Emperor Valens from the Trier Mint

Forbidden Love at Père Lachaise Cemetery

Have you heard the tragic story of Heloise and Abelard? The remains interred at Père Lachaise Cemetery number in the millions, but there are some tombs, like those of Heloise and Abelard, that deserve more than a passing glance. The cemetery, located in the heart of Paris, France is famous for the grave of Jim Morrison as well as … Continue reading Forbidden Love at Père Lachaise Cemetery

Don’t Let the Temple of Bel Die

I don't often comment on politics or current events, but I feel compelled to write about the senseless and sickening destruction of one of Syria's greatest treasures, the Temple of Bel in Palmyra, which was a UNESCO world heritage site. I am deeply saddened and troubled by this ATTEMPT to revise history by one of … Continue reading Don’t Let the Temple of Bel Die

10 History Blogs to Follow

Reposted from the Ancient History Encyclopedia Cuneiform Writing. Photographer Jan van der Crabben I've been spending most of my free time teaching 9th grade World History, but I'm thrilled too see Jaunting Jen included in the Ancient History Encyclopedia's list of 10 history blogs to follow. 10 History Blogs to Follow by Jade Koekoe There are hundreds … Continue reading 10 History Blogs to Follow

Conjecture or Fact? The Two Faces of Alexander the Great

The recent headline, "Mosaic of Alexander the Great Meeting a Jewish priest," recently caught my attention. I have been to Greece twice, once on an archaeological excavation, and I teach 9th grade World History. This is just the kind of headline to get my students excited about ancient Greece. It reminds me of the excitement … Continue reading Conjecture or Fact? The Two Faces of Alexander the Great

Saturday at Salubria

The name Salubria, comes from the Latin word for healthful, "salubrious." When you step in the mansion and feel the cool spring breeze blowing through the slightly offset north and south entrances, you can feel why the mansion earned its name. Have you ever wondered why old doorways are so small? I had always assumed … Continue reading Saturday at Salubria

Sperryville & Sister Caroline

The neatest bits of history can turn up just around the corner. Most of my musings have focused on grand historic sites around the world, but as I explore my new surroundings I can see that I don't need to travel 2,000 miles to see something cool. I haven't had much time to comment on … Continue reading Sperryville & Sister Caroline

7 Strange Artifacts from Malta

We know many things about history, but what we don't know outweighs what we think we know. Throughout my travels, I have come not only to embrace, but to seek out history's mysteries. If your eyes and your mind are open you can find mysteries whenever and wherever you travel. Malta is one of those places where … Continue reading 7 Strange Artifacts from Malta

Meet the Grey Sisters of Montreal

In 1737, Saint Marguerite d' Youville and three of her companions made a secret consecration to the task of helping anyone in need. Thus the Grey Sisters (sometimes called nuns) of Montreal were born. Their mission is one of love, respect, and compassion. Why you may ask, are they called the "Grey Sisters?" The first … Continue reading Meet the Grey Sisters of Montreal