The Masks of Mycenae

Of all the treasures I've laid eyes on in my life, none have fascinated me more than the five Mycenaean gold masks at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens. The museum is home to thousands of spectacular treasures, but the gold masks are the stars. Heinrich Schliemann discovered the masks in 1876, while excavating in Mycenae, Greece. Three of the … Continue reading The Masks of Mycenae

Two Ferries to Torcello

To get to Torcello I had to make a sacrifice. It was a big sacrifice becasue I only had one day in Venice, and a trip to Torcello takes nearly half a day. Looking back, some of the places that I have connected with the most are Byzantine, and this was no exception. It was a fast and easy … Continue reading Two Ferries to Torcello

Rainy Day at Montpelier

"Let it be red." Those are the words of Dolley Madison, when asked how she wanted the parlor of Montpelier decorated. Oh and what a red it is. The walls are covered in a soft, velvety red fabric wallpaper, and the chairs are upholstered in the same rich red fabric. Even the parlor curtains are red! I wanted … Continue reading Rainy Day at Montpelier

Mysterious Markings: Petroglyph National Monument

My first impression when looking out over the plain is that something happened here. I can't articulate exactly what happened, but the sensation was there, along with a prickly feeling on the back of my neck. Before I even started exploring the site, I had to stand there and take it all in, and imagine … Continue reading Mysterious Markings: Petroglyph National Monument

Pic of the Week: Wartburg in Eisenach

Wartburg in Eisenach sounds like something from the Lord of the Rings, but it is a reality, not a fantasy. In 1068 Louis the Springer (1042-1123) count of Thuringia, began construction on the castle. Wartburg is unique because much of the inner castle is still intact and original, suffering neither decay nor destruction from WWII … Continue reading Pic of the Week: Wartburg in Eisenach

Wartburg in Eisenach

Wartburg in Eisenach sounds like something from the Lord of the Rings, but it is a reality, not a fantasy. In 1068 Louis the Springer (1042-1123) count of Thuringia, began construction on the castle. Wartburg is unique because much of the inner castle is still intact and original, suffering neither decay nor destruction from WWII … Continue reading Wartburg in Eisenach

Porch of the Caryatids

At the top of the Acropolis in Athens, Greece is the Erechtheion, a temple constructed in 421 B.C. and dedicated to Poseidon and Athena. On the side of the temple is the Porch of the Caryatids, or Porch of the Maidens, which has a long and sad history. The history of the porch during ancient times alone could fill … Continue reading Porch of the Caryatids

Pic of the Week: Porch of the Caryatids

At the top of the Acropolis in Athens, Greece is the Erechtheion, a temple constructed in 421 B.C. and dedicated to Poseidon and Athena. On the side of the temple is the Porch of the Caryatids, or Porch of the Maidens, which has a long and sad history. The history of the porch during ancient times alone could fill … Continue reading Pic of the Week: Porch of the Caryatids

Ravenna: Italy’s Byzantine Beauty

I often fall into a daydream about past trips when staring at the computer all day at work, and this past Friday was no exception. Germany, 2009, Christmas 4-day weekend, what to do? Italy was the answer! Italy is a quick Ryanair hop from Germany, and after setting up in Bologna (where its cheap), I boarded the … Continue reading Ravenna: Italy’s Byzantine Beauty