Malta’s Neolithic Underground

Let me tell you all about Malt'a's secret neolithic underground. It's been a while be since my last update. The last few months have gone by in a flash. The new school year started in early August (I teach 9th grade world history as many of you know), I got married on the day after Thanksgiving (whoo-hoo), there was … Continue reading Malta’s Neolithic Underground

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Don’t Let the Temple of Bel Die

I don't often comment on politics or current events, but I feel compelled to write about the senseless and sickening destruction of one of Syria's greatest treasures, the Temple of Bel in Palmyra, which was a UNESCO world heritage site. I am deeply saddened and troubled by this ATTEMPT to revise history by one of … Continue reading Don’t Let the Temple of Bel Die

Saturday at Salubria

The name Salubria, comes from the Latin word for healthful, "salubrious." When you step in the mansion and feel the cool spring breeze blowing through the slightly offset north and south entrances, you can feel why the mansion earned its name. Have you ever wondered why old doorways are so small? I had always assumed … Continue reading Saturday at Salubria

Meet the Grey Sisters of Montreal

In 1737, Saint Marguerite d' Youville and three of her companions made a secret consecration to the task of helping anyone in need. Thus the Grey Sisters (sometimes called nuns) of Montreal were born. Their mission is one of love, respect, and compassion. Why you may ask, are they called the "Grey Sisters?" The first … Continue reading Meet the Grey Sisters of Montreal

A Severed Hand, A Hidden Tunnel, and Salisbury’s Oldest Pub

The Oldest Pub in England? Probably not, but the Haunch of Venison is definitely the oldest in Salisbury, and the most unique pub that I have ever visited. From the 'ladies box" up front with its own door; to the pewter bar and severed hand on display, this place certainly has character and history. When … Continue reading A Severed Hand, A Hidden Tunnel, and Salisbury’s Oldest Pub

Curse Scrolls, Mystery Cults, and the Secret Roman History of Mainz

I’ve neglected my blog for a little while to pursue my license to teach middle and high school history. When I first started Jaunting Jen, I thought I wanted to travel full time, but after two months in Europe and Malta, it's clear to me that it's better to maintain a base to travel from for … Continue reading Curse Scrolls, Mystery Cults, and the Secret Roman History of Mainz

Four Gold Hats: A Bronze Age Mystery

After viewing thousands of artifacts in multiple museums, sometimes it can be tempting to just keep walking. But then there are times when something just grabs you, stopping you in your tracks.That's what happened to me when I was in the Speyer, Germany State Museum a few days after visiting Museum Island in Berlin. I … Continue reading Four Gold Hats: A Bronze Age Mystery

The Byzantine Beauty in Berlin

You would never guess that main attraction of the Bode Museum in Berlin is a mosaic from Ravenna, Italy. The Bode Museum on Museum Island houses a unique collection of Byzantine art, and I went there specifically for their Byzantine collection. I had no idea that a mosaic from Ravenna was waiting for me at the end of the exhibition hall. … Continue reading The Byzantine Beauty in Berlin

The Last Moments of Pompeii, 79 A.D.

A lot of people have been to Pompeii, and a lot of bloggers have written extensively about the city. However, each perspective is unique, and no two people will experience the city in the same way. Pompeii was a thriving cosmopolitan Roman city near Naples, Italy. Although the city was conquered by the Romans in 80 B.C., it … Continue reading The Last Moments of Pompeii, 79 A.D.

The Church of Bones

If you want to go to a place where you can be reminded of your own mortality, there's no better place on earth than the Sedlec Ossuary at Kutna Hora, just outside of Prague, Czech Republic. This Bone Church is one of the most unique places of worship in the world. When I stepped in … Continue reading The Church of Bones

Glass Slippers and Sixth-Century Wine

A trip to Cologne, Germany usually means a trip to see the Kölner Dom, or Cologne Cathedral, and why not? It's one of the most spectacular Cathedrals in Germany. However this post is not about the Cathedral, this post is about the modern-looking building right next door, the Römisch-Germanische Museum. If you're wondering what's so special about another … Continue reading Glass Slippers and Sixth-Century Wine

Pic of the Week: Wartburg in Eisenach

Wartburg in Eisenach sounds like something from the Lord of the Rings, but it is a reality, not a fantasy. In 1068 Louis the Springer (1042-1123) count of Thuringia, began construction on the castle. Wartburg is unique because much of the inner castle is still intact and original, suffering neither decay nor destruction from WWII … Continue reading Pic of the Week: Wartburg in Eisenach